Google's 'Switch to Android' app is now available for download.

TechCrunch discovered last week that the long-rumored “Switch to Android” app for iOS users had been quietly released to the App Store. The app enables users to migrate critical data from an iPhone to an Android device, including contacts, calendars, photos, and videos. While the app was technically available, it was not yet “officially” discoverable or searchable by App Store users. That is changing now, Google reports.

 

According to Google, the Switch to Android app began rolling out to the public on Monday evening around 6 p.m. PT. The company anticipates that this process will reach 10% of users by Tuesday, April 19, and 100% of users over the next couple of weeks.

 

According to reports, the app supports the same file types as Google Drive. Previously, Google recommended that users backup their contacts, calendar, photos, and videos via the Google Drive iOS app prior to switching devices. The new Switch to Android app accomplishes the same thing, but Google claims it provides a “simplified, faster” experience.

Additionally, Google provides a method for physically connecting devices to transfer additional content, such as music, audio, wallpapers, alarms, call logs, device settings, and free apps. However, the new app’s description on the App Store indicates that it can be used in place of “fussy cables” to perform the transfers.

 

Along with data transfer, the new Switch to Android app includes instructions on how to deregister iMessage in order to continue receiving texts on the new Android device.

 

Google says it plans to expand the app’s data type support over the next several months.

 

Transferring data from an iPhone to a Google Pixel device via the new app will initially support only Google Pixel devices, but will expand to include other OEMs in the future.

 

The launch builds on Google’s previous efforts to make it easier for users to migrate their content to the company’s platform and services via backend developments. This includes a recent update to the Google Photos app, which enabled users of mobile devices to import photos from competing cloud storage services such as iCloud, Facebook, and others.

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